Saturdays at the "Tianguis"

The last 2 Saturdays, Jorge and I have gone to his aunt’s house to sell our used stuff at the local tianguis (pronounced “Tee-AHN-geese”), a kind of Mexican flea market. In his aunt’s neighborhood, people set up stands along the street to sell snacks, books, used clothing, video games, makeup, and the list goes on and on. In previous years I’ve sold my used clothes to earn up to $500 pesos in a day (about $50 dollars for my US readers). We haven’t been so lucky the last 2 weekends because we keep getting rained out, but we’ll keep trying until there’s sunshine. At any rate the afternoon is never a total loss since Jorge’s aunts always have tamales, brazo de reina, and fried fish on-hand for lunch!

Here are some photos from Cancun’s Saturday tianguis

This last photo is my makeshift used clothes stand. I love so many of the clothes I’m selling, but many no longer fit me since I’ve lost weight. And some of those shoes have amazing memories! I haven’t had the chance to wear them in years (I wear a work uniform 6 days a week), but haven’t been willing to let them go for a very long time. I also have 2 bridesmaids dresses from my wedding, but I doubt I’ll be able to sell them at the tianguis since they’re more expensive items.

What kind of local markets do you have in your city?

Setting up a Day of the Dead Altar

Here in Mexico, November 2 is Day of the Dead, when everyone celebrates and remembers their family members who have passed on.

Altars are set up in homes with pictures of the deceased, alongside the deceased’s favorite foods, drinks and more. Here in Cancun, people started setting up altars as soon as Saturday.

Sunday night, Jorge and I went to Cancun’s Market 23 with our friends Juan and Viri to buy some altar items for Viri’s house.

Market 23

Candy mmm!!

Tiny "Calaveritas" made of sugar... traditionally, you place one to represent each deceased family member on the altar, plus one for extended relatives, plus one for all those who don't have anyone to make their altar

"Pan de Muerto" (Bread of the Dead) is sold only around this time of year. You can eat it (Starbucks is selling it right now) or place it on your altar... or both!

"Flor de Muerto" (Flower of the Dead) - Marigolds are always placed on altars. Most altars have whole flowers along with petals scattered on them.

These cut-out paper banners are usually used to cover the altar.

Candles and incense are also used on many altars.

My friend Viri buying candies and holding flowers for her brother's altar

I didn’t get a photo of Viri’s altar (stupid camera battery), but here’s something similar so you get an idea:

This post is getting a bit long, so I’ll wait until tomorrow t0 tell you about my encounter with “La Catrina”!