I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream When Plunging Facefirst into the Jungle

Thud. Zhhhhooooooom.

That, dear readers, is the terror-inducing sound that means you’ve just been dumped face-first off of a tower into the jungle.

“Oh no… oooooh no…”

That’s the sound of me right before being pushed off a platform while desperately clinging to a bungee rope (followed in quick succession by a steady stream of expletives and several instances of taking the Lord’s name in vain). 

Cancun bungee swing

TERROR.

 

I don’t wanna give too much away here because it’s kind of a tour you need to experience for yourself, but my Saturday at Selvatica was AMAZING. I did things I never thought I’d be brave enough or strong enough to try. The setting was gorgeous with newly-built zipline towers and a beautiful hub area that actually took my breath away for half a second. And the service was without a doubt the best I’ve had anywhere… the staff is clearly having tons of fun, pulling pranks and joking around while still being professional.

 

Selvatica jungle zipline
Cancun jungle tour
Selvatica Cancun

 

Despite having me absolutely terrified, my absolute favorite part of the day was the bungee swing! Pictures can’t do it justice, so here’s a recent video I found on YouTube:

 

Surprisingly, the most relaxing part of the day was the Superman zipline, the fastest in Latin America, where you speed face down over the jungle with your arms spread out, reaching speeds of up to 85 kilometers per hour.
Selvatica Superman zipline

I swear this is much, much higher up than it looks, you guys.

 

After a morning of endless zipline fun, we did a Polaris ride through the jungle then swam in a cenote. (I was too boring to jump off the platform into the water, but still had a wonderful time floating in the water!)
Jungle tour Cancun

Typical Cancun weekend.

 

This was the “Gimme All” package at Selvatica where you get to try EVERYTHING (all ziplines, Polaris/ATV, cenote, canopy walk, and I’m sure I’m forgetting some things because I was happily exhausted by 3pm). Anyway, if you’re one of those crazy adrenaline adventure-seeking travelers, please make sure to do a day at Selvatica on your next trip to Cancun! I’d say these are the most challenging and extensive ziplines in the entire Cancun/Riviera Maya area, only for the brave 🙂

 

Cancun Travel: Solo Exploring or Organized Tours?

Followers and friends often ask me which I’d recommend when traveling to the Cancun and Riviera Maya areas: going out to explore on your own, or booking a tour?

This past weekend, I had the opportunity to go on an organized tour with my friends at GoMexico, a Cancun-based company that offers tours in several of Mexico’s top travel destinations. We took the Tulum + Cenotes Plus tour, and I LOVED IT. The day’s itinerary would take us first to the Maya ruins of Tulum, then to a cenote park called Aktun Chen just north of Tulum. We were taken everywhere on a comfortable, air conditioned bus, and I frequently found myself comparing the experience to a similar day last year when I had taken my sisters on a Tulum/cenote day trip using the public van system. Which experience was better? Which experience would I be more likely to recommend? The comfortable and convenient organized tour? Or the self-made family itinerary with nobody but me as the primary tour guide?

Tulum Riviera Maya Caribbean Sea

The Transportation

When I took my sisters to Tulum last year, we got there by using the public van system out of Playa del Carmen, with cheap “colectivo” vans that take you up and down the main Riviera Maya highway (read more on that experience here). While cheap, the vans were somewhat uncomfortable and always full… Not necessarily a problem if you’re only going on a half hour trip, but something to consider for people with mobility problems. The region’s main destinations (Cancun, Playa del Carmen, Akumal and Tulum) all have designated spots in town where you can find the vans, but when on the highway after visiting a cenote, you have to flag them down by the side of the road. It’s a bit hectic to figure out the first time, but pretty easy once you know what you’re doing. By contrast, the bus with the GoMexico tour was air conditioned and very comfortable with reclining seats, great for napping. Tour buses usually pick you up straight from your hotel, or from an easy-to-access location in a popular tourist area. From there, they take you to each of the day’s tour locations, then back to your hotel, or close to it. Easy peasy. And bonus: They’ll usually serve you a boxed breakfast and/or lunch along the way!

Cancun tour bus

Our tour bus and part of the group! (You can see me in the bus staring out the window) Photo by @ConnyCun

Tulum Ruins

I’ve been to the Maya ruins of Tulum over my past decade living in Cancun, but this was my first time visiting the site with an organized tour. Having a tour guide was WONDERFUL. Thanks to our ruins guide Cesar, I learned so much about why the ancient city of Tulum was built a certain way (often relating to the sun’s positioning throughout the year), as well as its history and way of life. Cesar even took us to spots around the site that I’d never thought to visit before! If you go to Tulum on your own, you can still hire a guide at the entrance to take you through the site, and if you have all day with nowhere else to go, you can even spend the afternoon at the beach below the ruins, one of my favorite places in the world.

A little language trivia: While we were at Tulum last weekend, some Mexican friends and I got into an interesting discussion on the use of the word “ruins”. In Mexico, they tend to prefer the phrase sitio arqueológico (archaeological site), while ruinas (ruins) might be considered an insult. On the other hand, in English the word “ruins” has a feeling of mystery and romance and has become the more preferred phrase, while “archaeological site” is hardly used at all… and when it is used, it sounds a bit cold, scientific and impersonal.

Tulum beach

Me on the Tulum beach a few years ago, when Jorge and I were spending the weekend in town

Tulum Mexico beach

Tulum beach last weekend

Tulum doorway Maya ruins

Cloudy day…

Tulum tour guide

Our group learning from guide Cesar

 

Tulum train

On the Tulum train with @zukogirl and @pptotravel

 

Tulum Cancun tourist

Yours truly last weekend

 

Tulum guide

Oh-so-casually leaning against a palm tree while listening to the guide (photo @marhubarreto)

 

Tulum beach photo

A small crowd getting in some beach pics

 

Tulum building

Beautiful city!

 

Tulum rock formations

Tulum’s beach has the best rock formations

The Cenote

The second leg of our tour with GoMexico took us to a place called Aktun Chen. Here, we were given a Mexican-style lunch before we were taken to see some of the features of this area: a 20-minute walk through stunning caves, followed by an hour swim and snorkel in what is, to date, the most gorgeous cenote I have ever seen. The cenote at Aktun Chen is almost entirely enclosed within a cave; stalactites hang over clear, blue waters, and beautiful stalagmite formations lurk below to create a memorable snorkeling experience. Booking a tour will often let you visit some of the region’s most amazing cenotes located deeper in the jungle (like Aktun Chen), and using the van system limits you to the cenotes located closer to the highway, like Jardin del Eden or Cenote Azul. When renting a car, you have no limit to your choices.

Aktun Chen cave lake

Spelunking

 

Aktun Chen Mexico caves

Ok so clearly GoMexico’s photos are way better than mine

 

Aktun Chen cenote

Love. Love. Love.

My Verdict: Solo Exploration or Organized Tour?

Well, I guess in the end I don’t have a huge preference either way as it mostly depends on who’s asking!

If you’re a tourist: Go for the organized tour. There’s no hassle, no headaches, no questioning if you’re going in the right direction, no wasting precious vacation time getting lost, and you’ll probably get to see the area’s more impressive attractions, even if they’re harder to reach. You won’t have to figure out where to get lunch, your bus will be comfortable, and your pick-up spot will be easy to find.

If you’re a resident or a frequent visitor to the area: Do mostly solo exploring to save money and see places other tourists might not ever get to visit, BUT book a tour every once in awhile to see some of the Riviera Maya’s most beautiful and hard-to-reach locations. If you have a car – or can rent a car – or have a local friend with a car… well, that’s the best of both worlds.

No matter which option you choose, I hope you have fun exploring Cancun and the Riviera Maya!

Travel Like a Local? Or Travel Like a Tourist?

Much of my career is based around the simple fact that I am a Cancun local.

You can come to me if you want to know the cheapest ways to get around town, the best place for tacos, where locals hang out on weekends, and the best bars off the main hotel strip.

And this works out well for me. Why? Because the hot new trend in travel is to experience a city “like a local”. Like me. Like my friends.

The beach at sunset in the upscale tourist neighborhood of Playacar, Playa del Carmen

My family checking out the sunset in the off-the-beaten-path lagoon at Isla Blanca

Every year, it becomes increasingly less cool to look like a tourist or act like a tourist… even if you are a tourist.

I would like to present the other side of the coin: sometimes the touristy stuff is the coolest stuff.

My favorite example is where to get tacos in Cancun. Yes, there are some really great tacos al pastor right by my house. Some of the best in the city. The place fills up on Sunday at noon (right after mass lets out) with a long line down the sidewalk. But you know which taco joint I always recommend? La Parrilla. Yes, I’m talking about the tourist-filled taco restaurant on Avenida Yaxchilan that everyone visits after shopping at Market 28. Yes, the one with all the mariachi groups and the waiters who balance giant margaritas on their heads. It is without a doubt the most touristy taco place in Cancun. But guess what? Those tacos al pastor are friggin’ delicious. And it’s easy to find. And the margaritas are pretty good, too. And you won’t have to face Moctezuma’s Revenge the next day (unless you overdo it on the margaritas). La Parrilla is super-touristy, but they serve amazing authentic Mexican tacos that surpass many of the most hidden-away street carts.

I always say, “Sometimes touristy places are touristy for a reason. It’s because they are good.”

My family came to visit last week. My sister and brother-in-law really wanted 3 things:

1. To visit a cenote

2. To visit Xcaret

3. To eat at a hole-in-the-wall taco place where “they might get sick”

My brother-in-law almost seemed ashamed about wanting to see Xcaret because it is so touristy. But guess what? Xcaret is really, really cool. It’s always on my lists for best day tours from Cancun. It’s filled with tourists, but it is AMAZING. Stunning. Fascinating.

But on the “travel like a local” side of things, Jorge and I took my sisters and brother-in-law out to a cenote that most non-Mexican tourists don’t know about. We took a cheap colectivo van to get there and back, just like the locals. We snorkeled. We jumped off a cliff. Then we took another colectivo van to the Mayan ruins of Tulum. (Ok, the ruins were touristy, but we did it local-style… except for the hazelnut praline coffee I bought at the new Tulum Starbucks… seriously) It was everyone’s favorite day of their vacation, and it cost us less than $20 dollars per person.

Jumping off the cliff at Cenote Azul

Me (left) with my middle sister in a touristy area of Playa del Carmen

I guess in the end, my advice would be this: When traveling to Cancun, try to get the scoop on hidden local gems and ways to save, but don’t disregard the touristy stuff just because you won’t look as cool to your Instagram followers. You might be missing out on something amazing.

Our Cozumel Anniversary Trip

We’ve been married for 5 years! It’s hard to believe it has been so long since our wedding day back in 2010, and Jorge and I still have so much fun together. We would have loved a huge week-long vacation to celebrate, but a newborn sure changes things. We left the baby with Jorge’s parents, and jetted off to Cozumel for the weekend. And by “jetted off”, I mean we took the ADO bus to Playa del Carmen, then the cheapest ferry to the island. Of course.

Our friends Juan and Viri celebrate their anniversary the day after we do, so we made it a couples weekend. Viri got us a room at this great little hotel called Vista del Mar. It sits right on the main road in Downtown Cozumel, and it has an ocean view. I loooooved hanging out on the balcony!

Our first day on Cozumel, we rented a Jeep that was clearly well-used (to put it nicely), and had a little road trip around the island.

We use a selfie stick. Deal with it.

We wanted to hang out at the Punta Sur beach, but the entry fee was very expensive for us, so off we went in search of something else. The entire Caribbean Sea has been suffering from a huge sargasso problem the past few months, so we had to settle for the closest beach with as little sargasso as possible. I was so bummed by the whole sargasso thing that I didn’t take any beach pictures, but we did end up at this cool little beach bar in the middle of nowhere that I absolutely LOVED.

Viri asked the bartender his name, to which he replied “Luis Forever”. The bar had a neighboring souvenir stand, plus a shaded hammock area on the beach.

Chillin' with Luis Forever

We were the only people in the hammocks when we arrived, but we were soon surrounded by all kinds of other travelers: a family with small children, a British couple, some couples, and a guy who kindly offered me a hit from his pipe. (People are SO NICE – but I politely declined.)

I also had my first alcoholic beverage in over a year – a really, really amazing mojito. But to be honest, I kind of liked Jorge’s coco loco better.

For lunch, we went to Muellecito at the southern end of Downtown Cozumel. Muellecito is a favorite of ours here in Cancun, but the one on Cozumel has an ocean view. Score. I’m OBSESSED with their caldo de camarón (shrimp broth) – first because it’s deliciously spicy, and second because it’s free. I also had a Long Island iced tea, which has like 3 kinds of alcohol in it, so I didn’t finish it because I started to get buzzed a third of the way through. That’s the danger of drinking something that tastes just like tea, but has zero tea content.

I don't remember this picture being taken.

The next morning, Viri and I noticed that there was a little entrance to the water right across the street from the hotel, and the water looked amazing! Turns out, the water around Downtown Cozumel is very, very rocky. Painfully rocky.

My feet were in a lot of pain when this picture was taken, but don't I look fabulous with the yacht in the background?

Later on a stroll through Downtown, we noticed a very nice beach just a block from the hotel. Oh well… missed the opportunity to swim here, but it sure looks nice in pictures!

Before hopping on the ferry back to the mainland, we got some lunch at a seafood restaurant called Tio Jose. The nachos were so, so wonderful, not to mention the seafood dishes. We grabbed a table right by the water, and there was a calm inlet with lots of families enjoying a Sunday swim.

We did so much more on this trip than I mentioned here. There was a haunted-house-style wings restaurant, a swim in the hotel’s terrace pool, watching local kids play in a fountain, some great omelettes, and a few road trip adventures where our Jeep almost exploded, but I really dropped the ball on the whole blogger taking photos thing. Hopefully you enjoyed the photos that I do have!

Isla Blanca: So This Is Where All The Kite Surfers Hang Out

Ok, fine. I didn’t actually do any kite surfing myself, but I found out where everybody else is doing it!

On Saturday morning, Jorge woke up to a text message from his friend Benja saying his family was going to Isla Blanca, and did we want to join them? I was dying for a beach day and since we don’t have a car, I jump at every opportunity to get a ride all the way up there.

I’ve been to Isla Blanca before (read about that in this old blog post!) and it had always been pretty busy, but this time we had the beach almost all to ourselves. Something tells me Isla Blanca must just get really busy on Sundays. Isla Blanca is a strip of land with the ocean on one side and a huge, shallow lagoon on the other. The best part of all: it’s virgin land. Apart from one or two little seafood restaurants and a handful of beach homes on the way there, it hasn’t been touched. With tourism booming, we don’t have many places like this left in the Mexican Caribbean. Every time I go, I see so many birds!

The downside was the large amount of seaweed on the beach. We’ve been getting a lot of seaweed in Cancun this year, but I hear it helps prevent erosion to make the beaches bigger! Nobody seems sure what is causing it this year, but I guess that’s nature for ya. 🙂

It’s not that easy to reach. Isla Blanca is about 30 minutes north of Downtown Cancun, and a large part of that drive is unpaved road. You really need a car (preferably a sporty one!) to get to Isla Blanca. But it’s so worth it.

When we got there, Benja’s parents had already set up lunch under the shade of a lone tree. A very cool location!

After chowing down on some chips and ceviche, we headed to the lagoon to explore a little. In addition to some brave guys wakeboarding behind a truck, which looks REALLY FUN, we also found some baby mangrove trees, a family playing with their dogs, and even a horseshoe crab! (I was so excited about seeing my first live horseshoe crab, but later my friends from Philly tell me they see them all the time back home… I guess it all depends on where you’re from!)

A 5-minute walk by the lagoon led us to a campsite with trucks and tents, which turned out to be a big group of kite surfers. It was the first weekend of “Semana Santa” (a 2-week Catholic holiday in Mexico), so I’m guessing that’s why it was so busy. I may be wrong. But there were dozens of kites over the shallow lagoon water taking full advantage of the windy day. We saw some jumps, some pretty fast kites, and even a few wipeouts!

There’s not much to say about the rest of our day at Isla Blanca. We spent the afternoon exploring, watching the ocean, eating and listening to music. Can’t wait til my next chance to go back!

Cancun Date Night at La Habichuela Sunset

Between our regular dinners at the taco stand around the corner and the Italian place with $50 peso lasagnas, sometimes Jorge and I like to mix things up with a date night somewhere special. Last week we discovered a place that offered the perfect mix of charm, service and great food. I’d heard plenty of great things about La Habichuela Sunset and seen some beautiful pictures of it online, but it shames me to admit that I hadn’t been there yet.

Jorge’s birthday seemed like the perfect time to finally try it! After all, it’s impossible not to celebrate with this handsome guy.

We walked in, and it was stunning. The entrance is on the restaurant’s second floor, so you have this amazing view of the entire restaurant, staircase and 2-story windows toward the garden and lagoon.

Jorge and I wanted to see the Wednesday night Mayan show, so we requested a table in the garden. Magical.

I’m a sucker for twinkle lights and lagoon views.

Before the show, some of the performers went from table to table to do some face painting. This is the closest I will ever come to looking like a Mayan, by the way.

The Mayan show was pretty fun! The performers even came out into the audience, so it was easy to get caught up in the atmosphere.

As cool as the whole atmosphere was, we loved the food just as much! We got Yucatecan tamales to start… lobster, duck and shrimp! The lobster was my favorite.

Jorge’s main course was the chicken Veronica, and I had the amaranth fish filet (with tamarind and mango sauces… wow!). Both items were the top recommended dishes by our waiter German, and he sure knew what he was talking about!

And my favorite part… dessert! What a fun experience. German brought all the ingredients right to us and prepared tableside crepes for Jorge, which he was kind enough to share with me. I gave him half of my tiramisu in exchange, so it was all fair.

I’m always surprised that despite its Mayan history, the city of Cancun doesn’t have nearly as much Mayan/Yucatecan cuisine as you would expect. I’m so glad La Habichuela Sunset gives tourists and locals alike the chance to try an upscale version of local recipes. This restaurant is located in the Cancun Hotel Zone at Kilometer 12.6, almost across the boulevard from Plaza Kukulcan.

To see their full menu and find out more about the restaurant, visit the La Habichuela Sunset website or Facebook page.

This Is How You Do a Bachelorette Party in Cancun

Cancun is a pretty cool place to live. I could lie and downplay things and say, “It’s not all it’s cracked up to be.” And sometimes there are tough days… but then I get to go on a bachelorette party yacht cruise to an island and it hits me that life is pretty good here in paradise.

My friend Jessica is getting married soon. She lives in Puebla, but she often comes to Cancun or the Riviera Maya for vacations, and her bachelorette party was no exception. Jessica’s a fellow Mexico blogger (check her out at MexicanAtHeart.com) and she brought a bunch of her family to Cancun to celebrate her last days of “freedom”. A few of us Cancun bloggers/friends joined her and her family for a Saturday afternoon bachelorette party on board a beautiful yacht called the Sea Horse from Sunset Marina & Yacht Club. The clouds were looming overhead all day, but we didn’t get rained on once.

We even ran into a bachelor party group at the marina, so of course we had to take a group shot before we split into our separate boats!

And guess who else was there? Fellow Cancun bloggers like Kelly (CancunCanuck.com), Kristin (WhatAmIStillDoingInCancun.com) and Marhu (MarhuBlog), plus one of my favorite Cancun tweeters Rebecca @BeccaMex. Yes, we’re all friends and if you follow our Twitter feeds you’ll see we hang out quite a lot!

First the Sea Horse took us through the mangroves of Nichupte Lagoon, then out to the Caribbean Sea. We were heading to Isla Mujeres! Along the way, we played some bachelorette party games and of course took some pictures of the amazing scenery.

I freely admit to getting pretty excited when the yacht anchored at North Beach on Isla Mujeres. We all know about my North Beach obsession, but very rarely do I get to see it from a boat. (I think this was the 3rd time.) Some of us couldn’t resist a little swim in the Caribbean Sea, and everyone had fun just hanging out on the boat with snacks and drinks. Just… oh my gosh, heaven.

Above photo by Kelly McLaughlin @CancunCanuck

After a few hours playing on the yacht, it was time to head back to Cancun, where I just napped for the rest of the afternoon. What a day!

After a day like this, it was easy for me to see why so many people choose Cancun for bachelor parties, weddings, honeymoons and anniversaries. My city has so many unbelievable ways to celebrate a special event!

Big thanks to the Sunset Marina and Yacht Club in Cancun… Beautiful place, beautiful boats and a beautiful event, as always!

Another Isla Mujeres Beach Day

By now it’s no secret that Jorge and I loooooove Isla Mujeres for a beach day! It’s so close to Cancun, the ferry ride is gorgeous, and the waters at North Beach are super calm for wave-haters like us.

So of course, we couldn’t start 2015 without a day on the island. Unfortunately, the day was very, very windy and even the pool-like water at North Beach had waves! We were disappointed at the rough-ish water, but that didn’t stop us from chilling on the beach all afternoon.

Not much new to say here, but I had to show you guys our pics from this weekend. From the Ultramar ferry to North Beach, Hidalgo Street and the Malecon.

 

Snorkeling Adventure in Tankah Cenote

Snorkeling used to terrify me. I would put my face under the water and instantly feel like I was being suffocated. Maybe that’s what claustrophobia feels like?

But living in the Cancun and Riviera Maya area, you have to get over your fear of snorkeling if you want to have any fun!

After 9 year living here, I’m finally comfortable snorkeling. The thought of barracudas still freaks me out more than I like to admit, but I’m trying to move past it. A few weekends ago, I went with a few of my coworkers from BuyPlaya Real Estate on a girls’ day in Tankah Bay! First we snorkeled in the ocean (no pictures, sorry), where we saw lots of huge colorful fish and the entrance to an underwater cave. No barracudas in sight, thank you God.

Next, we walked across the street to the main cenote in Tankah. I’m unsure of the name, but from quick internet searching it seems to be called simply “Tankah Cenote” or “Casa Cenote” (after the nearby restaurant). This cenote is interesting because it connects to the ocean through a large tunnel… the same one we saw when snorkeling in the ocean! It’s a completely open cenote, unlike many of the cave cenotes you’ll find throughout the Yucatan Peninsula.

Our group of four girls spent an hour or two exploring Tankah Cenote, which begins as an open pond-type area then becomes a long river through the mangrove.

The water was simply unbelievable. It reached 4 to 5 meters deep in most areas, but everything was crystal clear. Like swimming in a pool!

What I loved about Tankah Cenote was the mangrove on either side. As you’re swimming along, you see underwater forests of the long, thin roots on either side of you. The entire coast of the Riviera Maya is filled with mangrove, and it’s a huge part of the local eco system. At this cenote, you can see why! Mangrove roots thrive when growing in mud and water, so they serve as the perfect filter to keep the water clean and free of debris. In fact, the mangrove tree system is one of the main reasons that the ocean and cenotes in this area are so clear!

The mangrove is also home to lots of baby wildlife, as well. It must be fish hatching season, because we spotted thousands and thousands of baby fish living in the underwater mangrove roots. Just gorgeous.

During my snorkeling adventure in Tankah Cenote, I saw lots and lots and lots of baby fish, plus some bigger and more colorful fish near the floor. I even spotted a blue crab! (That little guy was hard to see because he was 5 meters below me and blended with the blue water. I had to dive down a few times to get better look.)

Tankah Cenote was also a fun place for me to get more comfortable with my snorkeling skills. Being in such clear, pool-like water made me feel safer than snorkeling in the waves of the ocean… with all the barracudas… ugh. And of course, my friends and I seized the opportunity to take some fun underwater pictures.

We also saw lots of divers. Apparently Tankah Cenote is also a popular spot for beginner divers, and there were several people there getting scuba diving lessons. I’ll stick to snorkeling for now, thanks.

Tankah Bay is located in the Riviera Maya, just north of Tulum. It has plenty of beautiful beach homes to look at, and of course great snorkeling locations. To get to Tankah Cenote, we drove down the main highway and turned left at a sign with a large peacock on it about 10 minutes after Akumal. Sorry I can’t be more specific!

All of these photos were taken by my friend Lisa Love Juliot, who works with me at BuyPlaya Real Estate.

Fenix Beach Club on North Beach Isla Mujeres

On the same day that we did the Seawalls mural tour of downtown Isla Mujeres, we also spent the afternoon at Fenix Beach Club! It was my first time there, and I was absolutely in love.

Fenix is located on the northern end of North Beach (by the bridge to the Mia hotel), and it has the same crystal clear, shallow waters that the rest of North Beach is known for… but with even less waves! Even though the water in this part was just as clear and beautiful as my previous North Beach pictures, for some reason it didn’t photograph quite as well. Very strange.

Jorge, my friends Tori and Laura and I had an awesome day with limonadas, ceviche and lots of time in the water. To use one of the beds and umbrellas at Fenix, we just had to consume $300 pesos in food and drinks. Not a problem.

Here are some of my favorite pictures! Since it was right in the middle of whale shark season, there were lots of tour boats just offshore enjoying their post-tour lunches. What a beautiful (and ridiculously hot) day.