The Pinche Mayita Mentality

In a few months, I’ll be the mother of a child who is part Mayan.

How cool is that?

This civilization that I learned about throughout my childhood history classes will soon be the ancestry of my very own son or daughter. Maybe my kid’s ancestors helped build the pyramid at Chichen Itza. Maybe they traded with the city of Tulum. Maybe they carved the statues at Ek Balam. Maybe they lived their lives in small villages in the jungles of Yucatan.

Everyone I know in Cancun is fascinated by ancient Mayan culture, locals and expats alike. We go on day trips to visit the massive ruins and post selfies from the tops of Mayan pyramids. We watch colorful Mayan shows at Xcaret or at our resort. We take pictures with the guys in the huge Mayan headdresses on 5th Avenue in Playa del Carmen.

So if we love Mayans so much… why do we hate Mayans so much?

During my years in Cancun, I’ve heard the phrase pinche mayita thrown around quite a bit. I guess it would translate to something along the lines of “little f***ing Mayan”. Sometimes people will just say mayita (“little Mayan”), which sounds like it might be nicer, but it never is. The term is typically used as an insult, or to refer to somebody who might be in a lower social class, or just based on their appearance. (The Mayan people tend to be shorter and have darker skin.) The phrase always rubbed me the wrong way, but even more so when I started dating a guy of Mayan heritage then married into his lovely Mayan heritage family.

Over the past few generations, the Mayan people of the Yucatan region have even stopped speaking the Mayan language. My husband’s grandparents speak fluent Mayan, although I’ve only ever heard them speak Spanish. My husband’s parents speak some conversational Mayan and occasionally teach me little phrases, but I never hear them use these phrases in actual conversation. My husband speaks no Mayan, except for a few curse words that his uncles and friends taught him. When I asked why their native language was never passed down, I was told it’s because people are now embarrassed to speak it.

I hope this next generation of Mayans can overcome the pinche mayita mentality and realize just how important and amazing they are… including my kid.

Another Isla Mujeres Beach Day

By now it’s no secret that Jorge and I loooooove Isla Mujeres for a beach day! It’s so close to Cancun, the ferry ride is gorgeous, and the waters at North Beach are super calm for wave-haters like us.

So of course, we couldn’t start 2015 without a day on the island. Unfortunately, the day was very, very windy and even the pool-like water at North Beach had waves! We were disappointed at the rough-ish water, but that didn’t stop us from chilling on the beach all afternoon.

Not much new to say here, but I had to show you guys our pics from this weekend. From the Ultramar ferry to North Beach, Hidalgo Street and the Malecon.

 

Cancun Is Home Now

I’ve lived in Cancun for almost 10 years now, but through all that time, the USA was always still “home” to me. I anxiously awaited every trip back to the States, and I closely followed the news back home.

This year, things changed.

Jorge and I just spent 2 weeks in the States (Christmas with my sisters, and New Years in Orlando). We had such an amazing time, but it seemed strange when I realized that I was anxious to get back to Cancun. When we arrived back in Cancun, I stepped outside the airport and smiled as the hot, humid air filled my nose while I pulled my suitcase through the parking lot. I was home. Cancun was home.

Throughout 2014, I also stopped reading news stories from the USA. Something inside me said, “These social problems aren’t your problems now. You don’t live in the USA. You haven’t lived in the USA since 2005. You need to focus on Mexico, now.”

Maybe it’s because my parents moved to South America this year. Maybe it’s because we’re having a kid that will grow up here and have Mexican heritage. Maybe I’ve finally just been here long enough to let go of another life. But I’m happy. I love Cancun.

This must just be another stage of expat life.

And now… Bonus pictures! Thanks for reading. Here are a few of our Orlando photos… it was so weird being a tourist! We’re used to being the cool locals, so making the transition to nerdy tourist was tough.